08 January 2015

Why modern science stays dumb

If you consider the Lorentz transformation in connection with Einsteinian relativity, special or general (with a tensor twist), it becomes clear that it's a chain tying time back to the 3 co-ordinates of homogeneous 3D Euclidean space, i.e. time fettered and made spatial AS the movement of light (electromagnetic radiation), the absolute movement, that dictates also whether this thus-bound space-time is straight or curved. Hence modern physics thinks it's got the whole game sewn up in its mathematical theories with their so-called universal constants, in particular, the gravitational constant.

The Big Bang theory, for instance, depends entirely and crucially on this fettered, linear time, i.e. the straight or (gravitationally) curved path of light. Otherwise it collapses, and the physicists could just as well pack up their toys (such as the multi-billion dollar Big Hadron Collider in Geneva) and go home. They're not going to do that.

Is it any surprise that physicists (and all scientists) have minds closed to the question of time? They all partake of the scientific Geist, our age's Weltgeist. Anyone open to the question of time is, scientifically speaking, obviously a nutter. Instead, today's advanced mathematical physicists working at the cutting edge are out to quantize time itself linearly in a theory of quantum gravity. They'll come up with something.

Hence modern physics is unknowingly, blindly as onto-theological as Dante's Divine Comedy with its river of unbodied light streaming down through ten heavens: Light and its movement are the Absolute for modern physics, and every physicist believes fervently in it. All glory to the photon!

This is déjà-vu all over again, Boo-boo: the struggle to emerge from Christian medieval times with a slight change of personnel, a couple of crucial mathematical substitutions such as 'Substitute the photon for Almighty God'.

One big challenge for the present time, to my mind, is to demathematize the world so we humans can see more clearly and perchance thus become freer. 

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